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Wildlife and Nature Protection Society Monthly Lecture October 18, 2018

Elephant habitats are declining and the frequency and severity of the Human – Elephant Conflict (HEC) is increasing, calling for alternative approaches to HEC management. Studies undertaken in Sri Lanka have shown that translocation and confinement are not a viable management strategy and jeopardize the survival of Sri Lanka’s elephants, both within and outside the protected areas (PAs) and with no long term benefit for reducing HEC.

Sunday, 14 October 2018 13:46

Don’t drive our jumbos to death

Govt. should implement cabinet-approved policy, former DWC DG, Dr. Sumith Pilapitiya tells Kumudini Hettiarachchi

Humans and wild elephants have lived ‘together’ for aeons in Sri Lanka. In fact, the country has bestowed upon elephants, domesticated ones of course, an honour not given to any other creature – that of carrying the Sacred Tooth Relic of Lord Buddha around the streets of Kandy to be venerated by large crowds.

As a conservation organization Wildlife and Nature Protection Society, WNPS is committed to protect all species. The wild boar or pig is no exception. Although the wild boar is considered an agricultural pest and can be killed by farmers, during daylight hours and makes the F.F.P.O’s negative list, together with a handful of other species. From an eco system perspective, it is an important species. It is the mandate of our organization to point out the following.

The winter abode of thousands of migratory birds to Sri Lanka is fast vanishing from our motherland; destroyed by the human hand. Sri Lanka, the final land mass before the vast expanse of the Indian Ocean opens out to reach The Antarctica, in the deep south is a winter haven. Sadly, Mannar, one of the last birding paradises in Sri Lanka is being ruined by human greed.

The topic of Sri Lanka’s biodiversity conservation at crossroads will come up for discussion at the Monthly Lecture of Wildlife and Nature Protection Society on 20 September at 6 p.m. at the Jasmine Hall of the BMICH.

Monday, 17 September 2018 09:32

This land belongs to both people and elephants

  • Rash decisions without considering science will end in disaster
  • ‘Proper’ fencing the answer and not restricting elephants to Protected Areas where they will starve to death
  • People and elephants can co-exist, environ mentalists urge

Serious concerns are being expressed in environmental circles and by the public about the decision to arm wildlife officials with sophisticated weaponry while fencing-in all the wild elephants.

The monthly lecture of the Wildlife & Nature Protection Society on September 20, at 6 p.m. at the Jasmine Hall of the BMICH will be delivered by Dr. Eric Wikramanayake on ‘Sri Lanka’s biodiversity conservation at crossroads’.

With over 270 elephants dying annually and the Purple-faced langur threatened with extinction, animal causes cry out for attention. A novel art exhibition has been organised by the Wildlife and Nature Protection Society (WNPS) to raise funds for conservation efforts.

Monday, 13 August 2018 04:32

SHELTERING UNDER THE LEOPARD’S UMBRELLA

Wildlife and Nature Protection Society Public Lecture _ August 2018

The Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Act, No. 2 of 1996 (as amended on October 14, 2015 under section 61) states that:

No person engaged in fishing operations in Sri Lanka Waters shall catch any shark of the species specified in the Schedule hereto except for the collection of museum, biological sampling for taxonomic study and research purposes…

The Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Act, No. 2 of 1996 (as amended on 14 October 2015 under Section 61) states that: No person engaged in fishing operations in Sri Lanka Waters shall catch any shark of the species specified in the Schedule hereto except for the collection of museum, biological sampling for taxonomic study and research purposes…

Sri Lanka has a high density of endemic birds – 34 as presently recognized. This is as a result of island biogeographic factors, including isolation, which makes Sri Lanka of special interest not only to local ornithologists and birdwatchers, but draws those from overseas as well. With such interest comes the pursuit of even more knowledge…

There is a mammal of Sri Lanka that can weigh up to 900Kg and grow to three meters in length, yet one that is rarely seen and whose local population teeters on the edge of extinction.

Saturday, 09 June 2018 06:52

Dealing with Wildlife

by Darshanie Ratnawalli
In Britain, a dog used to sleep in the same bed as a toddler. One day as the dog was sleeping, the toddler got into the bed and tried to hug the dog as she had done countless times before. Perhaps the dog was tired or disturbed by loud noises from the toddler’s birthday party that had been going on downstairs. He attacked. The baby was dead when the paramedics arrived.

Four major environmental organizations have raised strong voices of protest against reported moves to relocate the last two elephants living in the Sinharaja Rainforest, a World Heritage Site.