The topic of Sri Lanka’s biodiversity conservation at crossroads will come up for discussion at the Monthly Lecture of Wildlife and Nature Protection Society on 20 September at 6 p.m. at the Jasmine Hall of the BMICH.

Monday, 17 September 2018 09:32

This land belongs to both people and elephants

  • Rash decisions without considering science will end in disaster
  • ‘Proper’ fencing the answer and not restricting elephants to Protected Areas where they will starve to death
  • People and elephants can co-exist, environ mentalists urge

Serious concerns are being expressed in environmental circles and by the public about the decision to arm wildlife officials with sophisticated weaponry while fencing-in all the wild elephants.

The monthly lecture of the Wildlife & Nature Protection Society on September 20, at 6 p.m. at the Jasmine Hall of the BMICH will be delivered by Dr. Eric Wikramanayake on ‘Sri Lanka’s biodiversity conservation at crossroads’.

With over 270 elephants dying annually and the Purple-faced langur threatened with extinction, animal causes cry out for attention. A novel art exhibition has been organised by the Wildlife and Nature Protection Society (WNPS) to raise funds for conservation efforts.

Monday, 13 August 2018 04:32

SHELTERING UNDER THE LEOPARD’S UMBRELLA

Wildlife and Nature Protection Society Public Lecture _ August 2018

The Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Act, No. 2 of 1996 (as amended on October 14, 2015 under section 61) states that:

No person engaged in fishing operations in Sri Lanka Waters shall catch any shark of the species specified in the Schedule hereto except for the collection of museum, biological sampling for taxonomic study and research purposes…

The Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Act, No. 2 of 1996 (as amended on 14 October 2015 under Section 61) states that: No person engaged in fishing operations in Sri Lanka Waters shall catch any shark of the species specified in the Schedule hereto except for the collection of museum, biological sampling for taxonomic study and research purposes…

Sri Lanka has a high density of endemic birds – 34 as presently recognized. This is as a result of island biogeographic factors, including isolation, which makes Sri Lanka of special interest not only to local ornithologists and birdwatchers, but draws those from overseas as well. With such interest comes the pursuit of even more knowledge…

There is a mammal of Sri Lanka that can weigh up to 900Kg and grow to three meters in length, yet one that is rarely seen and whose local population teeters on the edge of extinction.

Saturday, 09 June 2018 06:52

Dealing with Wildlife

by Darshanie Ratnawalli
In Britain, a dog used to sleep in the same bed as a toddler. One day as the dog was sleeping, the toddler got into the bed and tried to hug the dog as she had done countless times before. Perhaps the dog was tired or disturbed by loud noises from the toddler’s birthday party that had been going on downstairs. He attacked. The baby was dead when the paramedics arrived.

Four major environmental organizations have raised strong voices of protest against reported moves to relocate the last two elephants living in the Sinharaja Rainforest, a World Heritage Site.

Vidya Athreya, senior scientist at the Wildlife Conservation Society, India and member of the IUCN Cat Specialist Group as well as the IUCN Task Force on Human – Wildlife Conflict will present the Wildlife and Nature Protection Society’s monthly lecture ‘ Living with Leopards’ on May 17 at the BMICH Lotus Hall at 6 p.m.

In January of this year, the media channels were all a buzz with the news of a leopard attacking people in the Hatton area, up in the hills of Sri Lanka. Disturbing reports surmised that it was a possible man-eater targeting the human population of the area. Another video was posted of a leopard being chased up a tree, and that tree set alight. The leopards successful efforts to escape death by immolation were also interpreted by a few as an act of aggression, and emotions in the public space ran high.

The Wildlife & Nature Protection Society will hold its monthly lecture on 17 May at 6.00 p.m. at the BMICH Lotus Hall focusing on “Living with Leopard” with an expert talk by specialist on the subject Vidya Athreya

Monday, 14 May 2018 11:44

LIVING WITH LEOPARDS

Vidya will be in Sri Lanka to deliver a lecture on ‘living with leopards’ at the BMICH on May 17 at 6pm. The lecture has been organized by the Wildlife and Nature Protection Society as part of its monthly lecture series. This public lecture is open to all. entrance is free.